'Shopping is cheaper than a psychiatrist'
Fashion, art, photography, culture and life style, a little piece of me and what I love.
'Shopping is cheaper than a psychiatrist'
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fash-cafe:

message me for a promo to 34k!
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naturally-hannah:

Protein Breakfast Smoothie Bowl

Smoothie: Almond coconut milk, 2 frozen almond coconut milk ice cubes, plain yogurt, spinach, almond butter, protein powder, Maca powder, frozen strawberries, frozen blueberries, frozen raspberries & frozen banana. -If it gets too thick add more milk or water :)

Toppings: Bear Naked Morning Power pack peak protein, bananas, blueberries, strawberries, mango & chia seeds
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the-daily-bite:

Follow me for more delicious meals! http://the-daily-byte.tumblr.com/
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maybe-okay-will-be-our-always-21:

. em We Heart It.
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cake-stuff:

More dessert & baking inspiration: http://cake-stuff.tumblr.com/
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food52:

Messy in the best way.
Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.
food52:

Messy in the best way.
Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.
food52:

Messy in the best way.
Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.
food52:

Messy in the best way.
Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.
food52:

Messy in the best way.
Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.
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confectionerybliss:

Triple Chocolate Pumpkin Cheesecake Skillet Brownie | Country Cleaver
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mullitover:


JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?
MERON MENGHISTAB: By the time I had gotten to sixth grade I had a deep obsession with history. I spent all my free time reading about the Roman Empire, and then all the way up to WWII. I was obsessed with how the modern world was formed, so I guess you could say at some point I wanted to be one of those over enthusiastic historians on the History channel, preaching about an obscure detail of the Spanish-American war. With that being said, I was also taking photography classes in middle school, and around the time I was 14-15 I traded a friend my mp3 player for a Pentax SLR plus some lenses, and committed to my current profession ever since.
JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?
MM: I would say my closest friends. Not all of them are artists, but I’ve been lucky to have some people in my life that I’ve known for many years now, that make me continuously ask myself what do I want my work to feel like. Whenever I have a series of images I don’t know if I like or I need guidance in terms of direction, I know I can ask my photography friends or even people who have never seriously picked up a camera for their opinion, and it will almost always enlighten me to new thoughts and ideas.
JC: What are you up to right now?
MM: I just got a photo studio space in Brooklyn to work out of so I’ve been making a lot more studio portraits then I use to. I initially wanted the space for deskwork, but I’ve found making portraits in a controlled environment is just as interesting, and I’ve been really enjoying exploring it. My work was almost strictly reportage/environmental portraiture before, now I feel like I’m growing into a place where I’m making both types of work consistently.
JC: Have you had mentors along the way?
MM: Completely. I am always telling people how lucky I am to fall into NYC when I was younger, and ending up meeting people who would guide me through the hectic industry that is freelance photography. A lot of great people saw my desire to do this and helped along the way, particularly two killer photographers, Chad Griffith and Matt Salacuse have been there for me from the start. I remember when I got my first editorial assignment, I took the job before even knowing where people rent equipment in NYC, and I scurried to both their homes the night before gathering any extra gear they had. The scariest part of starting a photography career is there are no set rules, it’s learn as you go, so knowing I always have these guys in my corner, I knew I could take on things I didn’t necessarily know I could handle. They explain to me how to play the game, it’s all a game, and you definitely need coaches. I hope that one day I’ll be able to hook up some 18 year old kid with a strobe head and a beauty dish 6 hours before his first assignment, because it meant a lot to me and I want to pass that kind of support mentality on in this industry.
JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?
MM: I’m based out of Brooklyn, NY but spend a lot of time back in my hometown of Seattle, Washington. What I love about NYC is how much drive and work ethic people have. You get what you put into this city, and it’s a great feeling when you’re rewarded for hard work here. I’ve met a lot of people here from all over, all with impressive stories, but the common factor whether it is an art director or cab driver, is an above average work ethic. I also play a lot of soccer around the city, a league in Redhook with mostly latino and south Americans, polish community in Greenpoint, Trinidad and Jamaican guys at the east river park, the amount of culture I experience in my week to week is priceless here. At the end of the day though, I don’t really know how to create without sometimes going back to the Pacific Northwest and diving back into the culture and community I grew up a part of. A lot of friends of mine have gone on to be successful in a lot of great things, both music and art, and it’s always great to go back and create with people I’ve known my whole life.
JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?
MM: In my mind when it comes to portrait photography advice I wish I had gotten, I’d say make the most subjective, bias work whenever you have the feeling to make it. I think while in school it’s very easy to either fall in love with a successful photographers work and wish to essentially copy it, or try to make work you think will lead to a big career. As a portrait photographer the work will only grow and be better if you are personally invested in much more then a great image. If you care about something, no matter how obscure of an idea it is, shoot it, and it will end up making your greater body of work better. I have a section on my website called, “my way home” that to me is just that. It’s a collage of things I felt like I just needed/wanted to be photographed, and I think following that urge to create organically, will help line up everything else I want to make in the long run.
JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?
MM: Making a plan B would imply I don’t think plan A will work. When there’s a will there’s a way, I suppose.
JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?
MM: When we say “creative community” I think from a business stand point totally, being able to have friends in the industry that you can create something great with is essential, but at the end of the day whatever place or persons that makes you feel inspired is all that matters. A lot of times I bounce ideas off of friends that have an interesting outlook on life for some inspiration, even if they’ve never seriously touched a camera. My brother has the best ideas!
@mullitovercc
mullitover:


JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?
MERON MENGHISTAB: By the time I had gotten to sixth grade I had a deep obsession with history. I spent all my free time reading about the Roman Empire, and then all the way up to WWII. I was obsessed with how the modern world was formed, so I guess you could say at some point I wanted to be one of those over enthusiastic historians on the History channel, preaching about an obscure detail of the Spanish-American war. With that being said, I was also taking photography classes in middle school, and around the time I was 14-15 I traded a friend my mp3 player for a Pentax SLR plus some lenses, and committed to my current profession ever since.
JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?
MM: I would say my closest friends. Not all of them are artists, but I’ve been lucky to have some people in my life that I’ve known for many years now, that make me continuously ask myself what do I want my work to feel like. Whenever I have a series of images I don’t know if I like or I need guidance in terms of direction, I know I can ask my photography friends or even people who have never seriously picked up a camera for their opinion, and it will almost always enlighten me to new thoughts and ideas.
JC: What are you up to right now?
MM: I just got a photo studio space in Brooklyn to work out of so I’ve been making a lot more studio portraits then I use to. I initially wanted the space for deskwork, but I’ve found making portraits in a controlled environment is just as interesting, and I’ve been really enjoying exploring it. My work was almost strictly reportage/environmental portraiture before, now I feel like I’m growing into a place where I’m making both types of work consistently.
JC: Have you had mentors along the way?
MM: Completely. I am always telling people how lucky I am to fall into NYC when I was younger, and ending up meeting people who would guide me through the hectic industry that is freelance photography. A lot of great people saw my desire to do this and helped along the way, particularly two killer photographers, Chad Griffith and Matt Salacuse have been there for me from the start. I remember when I got my first editorial assignment, I took the job before even knowing where people rent equipment in NYC, and I scurried to both their homes the night before gathering any extra gear they had. The scariest part of starting a photography career is there are no set rules, it’s learn as you go, so knowing I always have these guys in my corner, I knew I could take on things I didn’t necessarily know I could handle. They explain to me how to play the game, it’s all a game, and you definitely need coaches. I hope that one day I’ll be able to hook up some 18 year old kid with a strobe head and a beauty dish 6 hours before his first assignment, because it meant a lot to me and I want to pass that kind of support mentality on in this industry.
JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?
MM: I’m based out of Brooklyn, NY but spend a lot of time back in my hometown of Seattle, Washington. What I love about NYC is how much drive and work ethic people have. You get what you put into this city, and it’s a great feeling when you’re rewarded for hard work here. I’ve met a lot of people here from all over, all with impressive stories, but the common factor whether it is an art director or cab driver, is an above average work ethic. I also play a lot of soccer around the city, a league in Redhook with mostly latino and south Americans, polish community in Greenpoint, Trinidad and Jamaican guys at the east river park, the amount of culture I experience in my week to week is priceless here. At the end of the day though, I don’t really know how to create without sometimes going back to the Pacific Northwest and diving back into the culture and community I grew up a part of. A lot of friends of mine have gone on to be successful in a lot of great things, both music and art, and it’s always great to go back and create with people I’ve known my whole life.
JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?
MM: In my mind when it comes to portrait photography advice I wish I had gotten, I’d say make the most subjective, bias work whenever you have the feeling to make it. I think while in school it’s very easy to either fall in love with a successful photographers work and wish to essentially copy it, or try to make work you think will lead to a big career. As a portrait photographer the work will only grow and be better if you are personally invested in much more then a great image. If you care about something, no matter how obscure of an idea it is, shoot it, and it will end up making your greater body of work better. I have a section on my website called, “my way home” that to me is just that. It’s a collage of things I felt like I just needed/wanted to be photographed, and I think following that urge to create organically, will help line up everything else I want to make in the long run.
JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?
MM: Making a plan B would imply I don’t think plan A will work. When there’s a will there’s a way, I suppose.
JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?
MM: When we say “creative community” I think from a business stand point totally, being able to have friends in the industry that you can create something great with is essential, but at the end of the day whatever place or persons that makes you feel inspired is all that matters. A lot of times I bounce ideas off of friends that have an interesting outlook on life for some inspiration, even if they’ve never seriously touched a camera. My brother has the best ideas!
@mullitovercc
mullitover:


JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?
MERON MENGHISTAB: By the time I had gotten to sixth grade I had a deep obsession with history. I spent all my free time reading about the Roman Empire, and then all the way up to WWII. I was obsessed with how the modern world was formed, so I guess you could say at some point I wanted to be one of those over enthusiastic historians on the History channel, preaching about an obscure detail of the Spanish-American war. With that being said, I was also taking photography classes in middle school, and around the time I was 14-15 I traded a friend my mp3 player for a Pentax SLR plus some lenses, and committed to my current profession ever since.
JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?
MM: I would say my closest friends. Not all of them are artists, but I’ve been lucky to have some people in my life that I’ve known for many years now, that make me continuously ask myself what do I want my work to feel like. Whenever I have a series of images I don’t know if I like or I need guidance in terms of direction, I know I can ask my photography friends or even people who have never seriously picked up a camera for their opinion, and it will almost always enlighten me to new thoughts and ideas.
JC: What are you up to right now?
MM: I just got a photo studio space in Brooklyn to work out of so I’ve been making a lot more studio portraits then I use to. I initially wanted the space for deskwork, but I’ve found making portraits in a controlled environment is just as interesting, and I’ve been really enjoying exploring it. My work was almost strictly reportage/environmental portraiture before, now I feel like I’m growing into a place where I’m making both types of work consistently.
JC: Have you had mentors along the way?
MM: Completely. I am always telling people how lucky I am to fall into NYC when I was younger, and ending up meeting people who would guide me through the hectic industry that is freelance photography. A lot of great people saw my desire to do this and helped along the way, particularly two killer photographers, Chad Griffith and Matt Salacuse have been there for me from the start. I remember when I got my first editorial assignment, I took the job before even knowing where people rent equipment in NYC, and I scurried to both their homes the night before gathering any extra gear they had. The scariest part of starting a photography career is there are no set rules, it’s learn as you go, so knowing I always have these guys in my corner, I knew I could take on things I didn’t necessarily know I could handle. They explain to me how to play the game, it’s all a game, and you definitely need coaches. I hope that one day I’ll be able to hook up some 18 year old kid with a strobe head and a beauty dish 6 hours before his first assignment, because it meant a lot to me and I want to pass that kind of support mentality on in this industry.
JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?
MM: I’m based out of Brooklyn, NY but spend a lot of time back in my hometown of Seattle, Washington. What I love about NYC is how much drive and work ethic people have. You get what you put into this city, and it’s a great feeling when you’re rewarded for hard work here. I’ve met a lot of people here from all over, all with impressive stories, but the common factor whether it is an art director or cab driver, is an above average work ethic. I also play a lot of soccer around the city, a league in Redhook with mostly latino and south Americans, polish community in Greenpoint, Trinidad and Jamaican guys at the east river park, the amount of culture I experience in my week to week is priceless here. At the end of the day though, I don’t really know how to create without sometimes going back to the Pacific Northwest and diving back into the culture and community I grew up a part of. A lot of friends of mine have gone on to be successful in a lot of great things, both music and art, and it’s always great to go back and create with people I’ve known my whole life.
JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?
MM: In my mind when it comes to portrait photography advice I wish I had gotten, I’d say make the most subjective, bias work whenever you have the feeling to make it. I think while in school it’s very easy to either fall in love with a successful photographers work and wish to essentially copy it, or try to make work you think will lead to a big career. As a portrait photographer the work will only grow and be better if you are personally invested in much more then a great image. If you care about something, no matter how obscure of an idea it is, shoot it, and it will end up making your greater body of work better. I have a section on my website called, “my way home” that to me is just that. It’s a collage of things I felt like I just needed/wanted to be photographed, and I think following that urge to create organically, will help line up everything else I want to make in the long run.
JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?
MM: Making a plan B would imply I don’t think plan A will work. When there’s a will there’s a way, I suppose.
JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?
MM: When we say “creative community” I think from a business stand point totally, being able to have friends in the industry that you can create something great with is essential, but at the end of the day whatever place or persons that makes you feel inspired is all that matters. A lot of times I bounce ideas off of friends that have an interesting outlook on life for some inspiration, even if they’ve never seriously touched a camera. My brother has the best ideas!
@mullitovercc
mullitover:


JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?
MERON MENGHISTAB: By the time I had gotten to sixth grade I had a deep obsession with history. I spent all my free time reading about the Roman Empire, and then all the way up to WWII. I was obsessed with how the modern world was formed, so I guess you could say at some point I wanted to be one of those over enthusiastic historians on the History channel, preaching about an obscure detail of the Spanish-American war. With that being said, I was also taking photography classes in middle school, and around the time I was 14-15 I traded a friend my mp3 player for a Pentax SLR plus some lenses, and committed to my current profession ever since.
JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?
MM: I would say my closest friends. Not all of them are artists, but I’ve been lucky to have some people in my life that I’ve known for many years now, that make me continuously ask myself what do I want my work to feel like. Whenever I have a series of images I don’t know if I like or I need guidance in terms of direction, I know I can ask my photography friends or even people who have never seriously picked up a camera for their opinion, and it will almost always enlighten me to new thoughts and ideas.
JC: What are you up to right now?
MM: I just got a photo studio space in Brooklyn to work out of so I’ve been making a lot more studio portraits then I use to. I initially wanted the space for deskwork, but I’ve found making portraits in a controlled environment is just as interesting, and I’ve been really enjoying exploring it. My work was almost strictly reportage/environmental portraiture before, now I feel like I’m growing into a place where I’m making both types of work consistently.
JC: Have you had mentors along the way?
MM: Completely. I am always telling people how lucky I am to fall into NYC when I was younger, and ending up meeting people who would guide me through the hectic industry that is freelance photography. A lot of great people saw my desire to do this and helped along the way, particularly two killer photographers, Chad Griffith and Matt Salacuse have been there for me from the start. I remember when I got my first editorial assignment, I took the job before even knowing where people rent equipment in NYC, and I scurried to both their homes the night before gathering any extra gear they had. The scariest part of starting a photography career is there are no set rules, it’s learn as you go, so knowing I always have these guys in my corner, I knew I could take on things I didn’t necessarily know I could handle. They explain to me how to play the game, it’s all a game, and you definitely need coaches. I hope that one day I’ll be able to hook up some 18 year old kid with a strobe head and a beauty dish 6 hours before his first assignment, because it meant a lot to me and I want to pass that kind of support mentality on in this industry.
JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?
MM: I’m based out of Brooklyn, NY but spend a lot of time back in my hometown of Seattle, Washington. What I love about NYC is how much drive and work ethic people have. You get what you put into this city, and it’s a great feeling when you’re rewarded for hard work here. I’ve met a lot of people here from all over, all with impressive stories, but the common factor whether it is an art director or cab driver, is an above average work ethic. I also play a lot of soccer around the city, a league in Redhook with mostly latino and south Americans, polish community in Greenpoint, Trinidad and Jamaican guys at the east river park, the amount of culture I experience in my week to week is priceless here. At the end of the day though, I don’t really know how to create without sometimes going back to the Pacific Northwest and diving back into the culture and community I grew up a part of. A lot of friends of mine have gone on to be successful in a lot of great things, both music and art, and it’s always great to go back and create with people I’ve known my whole life.
JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?
MM: In my mind when it comes to portrait photography advice I wish I had gotten, I’d say make the most subjective, bias work whenever you have the feeling to make it. I think while in school it’s very easy to either fall in love with a successful photographers work and wish to essentially copy it, or try to make work you think will lead to a big career. As a portrait photographer the work will only grow and be better if you are personally invested in much more then a great image. If you care about something, no matter how obscure of an idea it is, shoot it, and it will end up making your greater body of work better. I have a section on my website called, “my way home” that to me is just that. It’s a collage of things I felt like I just needed/wanted to be photographed, and I think following that urge to create organically, will help line up everything else I want to make in the long run.
JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?
MM: Making a plan B would imply I don’t think plan A will work. When there’s a will there’s a way, I suppose.
JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?
MM: When we say “creative community” I think from a business stand point totally, being able to have friends in the industry that you can create something great with is essential, but at the end of the day whatever place or persons that makes you feel inspired is all that matters. A lot of times I bounce ideas off of friends that have an interesting outlook on life for some inspiration, even if they’ve never seriously touched a camera. My brother has the best ideas!
@mullitovercc
mullitover:


JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?
MERON MENGHISTAB: By the time I had gotten to sixth grade I had a deep obsession with history. I spent all my free time reading about the Roman Empire, and then all the way up to WWII. I was obsessed with how the modern world was formed, so I guess you could say at some point I wanted to be one of those over enthusiastic historians on the History channel, preaching about an obscure detail of the Spanish-American war. With that being said, I was also taking photography classes in middle school, and around the time I was 14-15 I traded a friend my mp3 player for a Pentax SLR plus some lenses, and committed to my current profession ever since.
JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?
MM: I would say my closest friends. Not all of them are artists, but I’ve been lucky to have some people in my life that I’ve known for many years now, that make me continuously ask myself what do I want my work to feel like. Whenever I have a series of images I don’t know if I like or I need guidance in terms of direction, I know I can ask my photography friends or even people who have never seriously picked up a camera for their opinion, and it will almost always enlighten me to new thoughts and ideas.
JC: What are you up to right now?
MM: I just got a photo studio space in Brooklyn to work out of so I’ve been making a lot more studio portraits then I use to. I initially wanted the space for deskwork, but I’ve found making portraits in a controlled environment is just as interesting, and I’ve been really enjoying exploring it. My work was almost strictly reportage/environmental portraiture before, now I feel like I’m growing into a place where I’m making both types of work consistently.
JC: Have you had mentors along the way?
MM: Completely. I am always telling people how lucky I am to fall into NYC when I was younger, and ending up meeting people who would guide me through the hectic industry that is freelance photography. A lot of great people saw my desire to do this and helped along the way, particularly two killer photographers, Chad Griffith and Matt Salacuse have been there for me from the start. I remember when I got my first editorial assignment, I took the job before even knowing where people rent equipment in NYC, and I scurried to both their homes the night before gathering any extra gear they had. The scariest part of starting a photography career is there are no set rules, it’s learn as you go, so knowing I always have these guys in my corner, I knew I could take on things I didn’t necessarily know I could handle. They explain to me how to play the game, it’s all a game, and you definitely need coaches. I hope that one day I’ll be able to hook up some 18 year old kid with a strobe head and a beauty dish 6 hours before his first assignment, because it meant a lot to me and I want to pass that kind of support mentality on in this industry.
JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?
MM: I’m based out of Brooklyn, NY but spend a lot of time back in my hometown of Seattle, Washington. What I love about NYC is how much drive and work ethic people have. You get what you put into this city, and it’s a great feeling when you’re rewarded for hard work here. I’ve met a lot of people here from all over, all with impressive stories, but the common factor whether it is an art director or cab driver, is an above average work ethic. I also play a lot of soccer around the city, a league in Redhook with mostly latino and south Americans, polish community in Greenpoint, Trinidad and Jamaican guys at the east river park, the amount of culture I experience in my week to week is priceless here. At the end of the day though, I don’t really know how to create without sometimes going back to the Pacific Northwest and diving back into the culture and community I grew up a part of. A lot of friends of mine have gone on to be successful in a lot of great things, both music and art, and it’s always great to go back and create with people I’ve known my whole life.
JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?
MM: In my mind when it comes to portrait photography advice I wish I had gotten, I’d say make the most subjective, bias work whenever you have the feeling to make it. I think while in school it’s very easy to either fall in love with a successful photographers work and wish to essentially copy it, or try to make work you think will lead to a big career. As a portrait photographer the work will only grow and be better if you are personally invested in much more then a great image. If you care about something, no matter how obscure of an idea it is, shoot it, and it will end up making your greater body of work better. I have a section on my website called, “my way home” that to me is just that. It’s a collage of things I felt like I just needed/wanted to be photographed, and I think following that urge to create organically, will help line up everything else I want to make in the long run.
JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?
MM: Making a plan B would imply I don’t think plan A will work. When there’s a will there’s a way, I suppose.
JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?
MM: When we say “creative community” I think from a business stand point totally, being able to have friends in the industry that you can create something great with is essential, but at the end of the day whatever place or persons that makes you feel inspired is all that matters. A lot of times I bounce ideas off of friends that have an interesting outlook on life for some inspiration, even if they’ve never seriously touched a camera. My brother has the best ideas!
@mullitovercc
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algdaugs:

I bet you didn’t know the sex positions women don’t like… http://algisvtinybytesme.org/10-sexual-positions-women-don-t-like
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algdaugs:

unresisted:

similar posts here

I bet you didn’t know the sex positions women don’t like… http://algisvtinybytesme.org/10-sexual-positions-women-don-t-like
+
algdaugs:

I bet you didn’t know the sex positions women don’t like… http://algisvtinybytesme.org/10-sexual-positions-women-don-t-like
+
algdaugs:

I bet you didn’t know the sex positions women don’t like… http://algisvtinybytesme.org/10-sexual-positions-women-don-t-like